Currently viewing the category: "Inspiration"

It’s no secret that Barbara Hill is one of my favorite designers. I’ve featured her work multiple times here, but have only just learned that her Marfa House is a different project than her Marfa Dance Hall home. And that’s all the excuse I need to do a post specifically about the Marfa House.

She’s the former Miss Texas (1956) and contemporary art dealer who has been called both a Texas Modernist and a Rural Minimalist, but she won my heart with her no-nonsense approach and pared-down style. These images of the Marfa House living space speak to this much better than my words ever could:

Marfa House by Barbara Hill Design: Eames sofas | japanesetrash.com

Marfa House by Barbara Hill Design: living space | japanesetrash.com

Marfa House by Barbara Hill Design: Bertoia Diamond Lounge Chairs | japanesetrash.com

Marfa House by Barbara Hill Design: living area | japanesetrash.com


The separating wall between the living space and bedroom features this credenza:

Marfa House by Barbara Hill Design: credenza | japanesetrash.com


The serene bedroom:

Marfa House by Barbara Hill: bedroom | japanesetrash.com


The patio with outdoor fireplace and an image of the house and grounds:

Marfa House by Barbara Hill Design: patio with outdoor fireplace | japanesetrash.com

Marfa House by Barbara Hill Design | japanesetrash.com

shop this post

I was in the midst of putting together a different post — one on modernist homes in the desert, something I’ll run soon, I’m sure — when I saw this image and it distracted me:

Entry area with terrific pieces and one of my favorite palettes. | japanesetrash.com

First off, this is one of my favorite palettes–the grey, white, and ambers-running-to-deep-orange hues. Secondly, as I learned when I explored more about this apartment, this is a retiree’s unit in an assisted living facility, which I find to be both amazing and very good news for all our futures.


Since it’s impossible for me not to take a further look around the space after seeing the first image, here is the dining area:

A simple dining space in a retiree's assisted living unit. | japanesetrash.com


And, to wrap up the brief tour, the bedroom:

Bedroom by RDK Design for Donald D. Powell. | japanesetrash.com

This is one of my favorite bedrooms on the planet. It’s a room that made me start thinking differently about contemporary interior design and one that has become so popular over the years that I think it’s now considered an icon of design. Today, I’m looking beyond the iconic bedroom and into the rest of the Francisco Costa home in NYC, courtesy of photography by Christopher Sturman.

This bedroom in the home of Francisco Costa has become iconic. | japanesetrash.com

But before we leave this room, let’s take a look at what makes it so appealing. The use of color and texture to create a soothing ambiance is spot on. The variety of size and type of art adds life. And the inclusion of a small table and a wall of shelving makes this space feel like a self-contained retreat:

The table and chairs plus the wall of shelving turn this bedroom into a retreat. | japanesetrash.com


The same types of elements carry over into the apartment’s study, where color, texture, art, and built in shelving–along with a refined but livable mix of furnishings–are to be found:

A refined but livable study. | japanesetrash.com

Here’s another shot of the study, along with the apartment’s owner, Francisco Costa. The mix of patterns here is interesting and brings a lot of visual interest to an otherwise serene space:

Terrific use of pattern in Francisco Costa's study. | japanesetrash.com


The clean lines and the herringbone pattern in the wood floor give this kitchen a Parisian feel:

The clean lines and the herringbone pattern in the wood floor give this kitchen a Parisian feel. | japanesetrash.com

Did you have a good break (those of you who had a long weekend)? I certainly did. I spent some time looking around on interior design blogs and Pinterest, and it occurred to me that these days it seems everyone has his own style. I think that’s as it should be, and it makes for endlessly fascinating browsing of great design images. But within all of the different styles out there, one thing remains constant: everyone goes for grey and white bathrooms. There seem to be a few typical ways the color scheme gets put into place; let’s look at some examples of grey and white bathrooms–be sure to let me know which one is your favorite:

Bringing grey in with paint is a popular — and easy — way to create a grey and white bathroom. This one punctuates the look with matching rhino heads:

This grey and white bathroom packs a wallop with matching rhino heads. | japanesetrash.com


Another way to bring grey and white into your bathroom is through using concrete as a statement, like this terrific concrete bathtub:

This amazing concrete bathtub makes a real statement. | japanesetrash.com


The flip-side of the previous look, this bathroom uses the concrete color everywhere but on the bathtub:

This white tub is set off by all the grey in this bathroom. | japanesetrash.com


Tile is always a good way to bring your color choice into a bathroom:

Sweet hexagonal tile in this grey and white bathroom. | japanesetrash.com


Or you can just clad the entire room in grey and white stone, creating a literal jewel box out of the space:

This bathroom is like a jewel box. | japanesetrash.com

(I was unable to find sources for these last two images; please leave a comment if you have information regarding where either of them came from and I’ll add that into this post.)

Stay Connected