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Awesome Keith Haring inspired graffiti art. | japanesetrash.com

Trends come and go; that’s why they’re called trends. Art is subjective—in the eye of the beholder, if you will—and that’s one of the great things about art: you’re either affected by something or you’re not. One person’s spray-painted abomination is another person’s perfect expression of self. So, when an artistic genre – like graffiti – becomes an interior design trend you can count on lines being drawn and people taking sides. – See more at: The Interior Collective

Okay, so it’s not so much the penthouse that’s preposterous, but the photos of the Axel Vervoordt-designed penthouse at the Greenwich Hotel in NYC that are both gorgeous and a little–okay, in some cases, a lot–ridiculous.

First, the exterior of the building; really love this architecture. Plus, the image is exactly the kind of thing you’d expect to see if you’re told it’s an image of the building:

The very handsome Greenwich Hotel in NYC. | japanesetrash.com

The simple simple simple — but exquisite — main bedroom:

Absolutely exquisite main bedroom of the penthouse at Greenwich Hotel. | japanesetrash.com

Now the damn-near perfect, like I could move in there tomorrow, living room:

This living room at the Greenwich Hotel is perfect. | japanesetrash.com

The bathroom. Really?!? Does Vanity Fair think our sensitivities are too delicate to actually withstand being shown some fixtures? A shower or sink, perhaps? No, just this:

This is what the editors at Vanity Fair think works as a photo of a bathroom. Please. | japanesetrash.com

And here we have a shot of the corridor looking into a guest room. Got to admit, this design is stunning:

A very rich palette is shown in this corridor shot at the Greenwich Hotel's penthouse. | japanesetrash.com

If this kind of design is your thing, I’m with you; it’s visually stunning. But c’mon… the photo that is supposed to show the bathroom? What is that? And there are plenty more images, if you follow the links in this post to Vanity Fair, that seem cut from the same cloth as that of the bathroom–weird vignettes featuring dead looking flowers.

But, again, the design is terrific. And those photos that actually show the design instead of focusing on trying to create atmosphere–and, to my mind, there’s enough atmosphere right there in the design, thank you–are also a treasure.

Do a search using Modernist Architecture and you’ll immediately fall down a rabbit hole from which there may be no return. Not that that’s a bad thing, mind you, if you love the style like I do. I love it, and I feel like I don’t know exactly how to define the hallmarks of it, which is part of what makes that kind of search so interesting to me. Here’s some of what I recently found after said search:

A Modernist home in Morocco. The fact that an entire house is set within that open block structure--which has its own interesting multi-story section--is amazing to me. | japanesetrash.com

This Modernist home in Morocco was designed by a protege of Philippe Starck. The fact that an entire house is set within that open block structure–which has its own interesting multi-story section–is amazing to me.


Then, there’s this much more modest Modernist prefab–most likely around the size of the house that’s inside the box in the above Moroccan home. You know I love a good prefab and the setting here is transcendent:

A modest Modernist prefab home in a transcendent setting. | japanesetrash.com


Followed by a classic Palm Springs Modernist abode, the Leff Residence. This is really what I tend to think of when I think of Modernist Architecture:

The Leff Residence in Palm Springs is really what I tend to think of when I think of Modernist Architecture. | japanesetrash.com


And now a rocky, beachy, rustic moment. Modernist homes do happen a lot in forbidding terrain, don’t they?

Seems like Modernist homes love a desolate, sandy or rocky terrain, don't they? | japanesetrash.com


Wrapping up with a Modernist beauty in the wooded wilds of Argentina.

A glowing modernist home in the wooded wilds of Argentina. | japanesetrash.com

Next time I fall down the rabbit hole in a search, let’s hope I end up somewhere as terrific as all of these places!

I’m heading out today to drive a few hours for a new client meeting near Houston, and while I’m away I’m leaving you with something a bit different: water. More specifically, water incorporated into outdoor / landscape design. This first image is the one that got me interested in seeing what I might be able to find in this area of design that would grab my interest–because this one certainly did:

These shapes and materials really grabbed my interest and got me focused on outdoor water features. | japanesetrash.com


Next, I found this example–showing me that just about any interior style might be interpreted outdoors:

I like the way this feels similar to a modern take on rustic that you might find indoors. | japanesetrash.com


Which made me want to start looking to see what other kinds of my favorite styles might be found outdoors. This is so GLAMasculine:

GLAMasculine stone and steel water feature. | japanesetrash.com


And this has a terrific modernist look:

A water wall with a terrific modernist look. | japanesetrash.com


Concrete, stone, and stainless steel. Some of my very favorite materials interpreted so handsomely in this outdoor water element:

Concrete, stone, and stainless steel: I'm in lust. | japanesetrash.com

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