Did you have a good break (those of you who had a long weekend)? I certainly did. I spent some time looking around on interior design blogs and Pinterest, and it occurred to me that these days it seems everyone has his own style. I think that’s as it should be, and it makes for endlessly fascinating browsing of great design images. But within all of the different styles out there, one thing remains constant: everyone goes for grey and white bathrooms. There seem to be a few typical ways the color scheme gets put into place; let’s look at some examples of grey and white bathrooms–be sure to let me know which one is your favorite:

Bringing grey in with paint is a popular — and easy — way to create a grey and white bathroom. This one punctuates the look with matching rhino heads:

This grey and white bathroom packs a wallop with matching rhino heads. | japanesetrash.com


Another way to bring grey and white into your bathroom is through using concrete as a statement, like this terrific concrete bathtub:

This amazing concrete bathtub makes a real statement. | japanesetrash.com


The flip-side of the previous look, this bathroom uses the concrete color everywhere but on the bathtub:

This white tub is set off by all the grey in this bathroom. | japanesetrash.com


Tile is always a good way to bring your color choice into a bathroom:

Sweet hexagonal tile in this grey and white bathroom. | japanesetrash.com


Or you can just clad the entire room in grey and white stone, creating a literal jewel box out of the space:

This bathroom is like a jewel box. | japanesetrash.com

(I was unable to find sources for these last two images; please leave a comment if you have information regarding where either of them came from and I’ll add that into this post.)

This week’s leftovers include a very appealing outdoor lounge in Denmark:

A tranquil outdoor lounge in Denmark. | japanesetrash.com


A contemporary kitchen with a shock of color via a yellow range:

This contemporary kitchen comes alive thanks to the shock of color in that range. | japanesetrash.com


Another–very different style of–contemporary kitchen uses contrast and materials to create interest:

This contemporary kitchen uses contrast and materials to create interest. | japanesetrash.com


I’m a huge fan of cinder blocks, and this massive fireplace uses them to great effect:

This massive cinder block fireplace is just my style. | japanesetrash.com


Wrapping up with this elegant entry to one of Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi’s homes:

Such an elegant entry at the Trousdale home of Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi. | japanesetrash.com

 


p.s. Yes, it’s a holiday here and, yes, I’m taking the day off (I haven’t forgotten my mini-rant on Friday about needing a break) but I couldn’t have a Monday without Leftovers!

Awesome Keith Haring inspired graffiti art. | japanesetrash.com

Trends come and go; that’s why they’re called trends. Art is subjective—in the eye of the beholder, if you will—and that’s one of the great things about art: you’re either affected by something or you’re not. One person’s spray-painted abomination is another person’s perfect expression of self. So, when an artistic genre – like graffiti – becomes an interior design trend you can count on lines being drawn and people taking sides. – See more at: The Interior Collective

I hope everyone has started to relax into the weekend. I have, but I also have a new post from The Interior Collective to share with you. Enjoy!

Plumen decorative bulb in a vintage worklamp fixture. | japanesetrash.com

Now and then I’ll see a photo on some site or other that shows something interior design related that I think is so AWESOME and I CAN’T WAIT to try it myself. Recently I saw a terrific kitchen renovation online that had lighting consisting of simple sockets hanging from black cords; what made them AMAZING was the decorative bulbs used with the plain fixtures. Those bulbs made all the difference in the world and I COULDN’T WAIT to give that a whirl in my own home. (Okay, I’ll stop with the yelling; you just need to know how exited I get some times about this stuff.) Problem was, I didn’t have any fixtures that would lend themselves to the extra cool factor of using decorative bulbs. So, as usual, I decided I wanted to post about it so that all of you could benefit from my excitement, even if I can’t. – See more at: The Interior Collective

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