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Ryann Ford is an interiors and architecture photographer who lives right here in Austin. Her work has graced the pages of The New York Times, Better Homes & Gardens, and Texas Monthly–just to name a few. She has a terrific eye and a wide-ranging portfolio. I’ve chosen just two of the projects she has worked on to show you, but there’s so much more to see at her website.

The first set of images come from a New York Times piece on a home designed and built by Austin architect, Burton Baldridge:

I'm digging the thin edge of the hot rolled steel counter against the rawness of the wood in that kitchen island. | japanesetrash.com

These are my favorite materials: concrete floors, steel and wood for the kitchen island, and plenty of glass.

This media loft is simple and just right. Loving all that light--plus the inset window that allows fresh air. | japanesetrash.com

The simplicity of this media loft really works for me. The flood of natural light is soooo nice, plus the added touch of an inset window to allow fresh air into the space.

This all works together so well--and is captured so beautifully by Ryann Ford's photography. | japanesetrash.com

More concrete, steel and wood–plus a nice fire, a bit of driftwood and a graphic print. Love this vibe.

The other project of Ryann Ford’s I’ve chosen are all photos of just one room in the home Roger + Chris used to own in Austin (you can see more of her shots of that house here):

The guest bedroom at Roger + Chris' former home in Austin, shot by Ryann Ford. | japanesetrash.com

Antlers, browns, textures, and a terrific paint job. | japanesetrash.com

Guest room detail-a cabinet of curiosities (with a Tivoli Model One thrown in). | japanesetrash.com

Everything about this room is remarkable–from the striking paint work to the use of textiles and accessories. And this space couldn’t be more different from the house at the start of this post, but both were captured masterfully by Ryann Ford.

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The orange fiberglass cube from CB2 in yesterday’s Designing with Orange post got me thinking about what’s important when I look to shop masculine design online and why that item stood out to me. I like the cube because it’s both decorative and functional–multifunctional, really, since it can be a table or stool then flipped over to become a cooler, a planter, or open storage. Plus, it’s got some style–which is an area the folks behind CB2 know something about, being part of the Crate&Barrel family. So I this morning I thought I’d take a quick look at the CB2 site, just to see what I might find that filled the bill on style and practicality, and right on the home page I found this handsome devil:

Find out my tips on how to shop masculine design online & whay CB2's Radial Chandelier is just my kind of piece | japanesetrash.com

Called the Radial Chandelier, he’s got plenty of charm and is just the kind of thing I look for when I shop masculine design. With a powdercoated iron body and those exposed wires and socket caps, this a piece that would look great for years to come. I’ll be honest, I didn’t really expect to see something this aligned with my personal taste as the first thing on their site, so I was intrigued and decided to click through to see the rest of what CB2 had to show for their new collection.

NOTE: This is normally the place when I’m reading a post like this on someone else’s site that I begin to think, “Oh, CB2 is paying him for this post.” Not the case here–this is not a sponsored post, and–though based on what I’ve found today I certainly would not mind one–I have no relationship, financial or otherwise, with CB2 or Crate&Barrel. Hopefully, the motivation behind this post is about to be made clear.

And, when I clicked through to see more, here’s one of the things I found:

The impluse to shop masculine design at CB2 seems like a no-brainer with images & pieces like this | japanesetrash.com

Well now. There you go. Just look at the rich color and terrific elements in that wall–the wood detail and the industrial lighting. Check out the rug and those tables. This is my flavor, no question. And, right then, when I saw this image, I knew I wanted to post about how I wiykd approach the shop masculine design experience at CB2. It also occurred to me that I don’t think–other than shameless plugs for my own Japanese Trash shop and some random, half-hearted links to products in posts now and then–that I’ve ever written a post focusing on what to look for when you shop masculine design. Why not start now with CB2?

Let’s take a look at the two pieces from the above image that I really like:

Shop Masculine Design: Tables & Rug

Find out what I look for when I shop masculine design & my thoughts on these two items from the new collection at CB2 | japanesetrash.com

These have some hallmarks of masculine design that are the kinds of things I always look for – the tables incorporate shapes that might have been popular 50 or 60 years ago and they have the gunmetal tones I like so much, while the rug is graphic, full of texture, and is in my favorite color palette. There of plenty more items I found on the site that I may do a follow up post about when I have time to go into more detail about why I might choose them. And, at the same time, there’s lots that don’t flip my switch.

I will post more of my thoughts when I shop masculine design, if that’s something you guys are interested in–leave a comment and let me know!


Edited to add: I’ve wondered for some time if the social login requirement for comments that I added a little over a year ago (to combat the tremendous amount of comment spam I was getting) has deterred comments on posts, so, since I’m asking for feedback on this one I thought I’d turn it off to see if that helps increase actual comments. Thought that any of you who’ve avoided commenting because of the whole social login thing should know that you no longer have to jump through those hoops, so let me know if more posts on what to look for when you shop masculine design would be something you want to see!

Images from the past week that didn’t make it into posts.

This week’s leftovers include this cool industrial apartment building in Australia:

This week's leftovers include this cool industrial apartment building in Australia. | japanesetrash.com

Via desire to inspire.


A frosty feeling using marble and blue:

More leftovers: a frosty feeling using marble and blue | japanesetrash.com

Via sfgirlbybay.


Contemporary elements bordering the wilds of nature:

Monday Leftovers: Contemporary elements bordering the wilds of nature | japanesetrash.com

Via DustJacket.


A serene collection of gunmetal grays:

A serene collection of gunmetal grays on this week's leftovers | japanesetrash.com

Via Bolig Magazine.


And a mysterious monolithic entryway in a stark and contemporary garden:

This week's Leftovers culminate in a mysterious monolithic entryway in a stark and contemporary garden | japanesetrash.com

Via heaton.

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The bedroom space from my post on Thomas O’Brien has been a favorite of mine for many years; it shows the power of a well-edited collection and an artistic aesthetic. It also spotlights his famous use of the star chart, which he has written about on the Aero website. That piece has been a touchstone of sorts for him through the years and is the kind of item that brings a feeling of personality and life to a room. I thought I’d showcase a few of his images featuring the chart and perhaps inspire you to identify and display your own personal totem in your home.

StarChart7

StarChart4

StarChart5

StarChart6