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I don’t have a green thumb. Every time I try to keep plants indoors, it doesn’t work out like I hoped. While I like the idea of having plants here and there, the reality for me is I wind up with sad pots filled with dirt–once the body of the deceased has been disposed of. But it’s a given that one sure fire way of incorporating nature into your interiors is with indoor plants, so here’s a very brief look at a few stylish examples of that:

Black, White & Grey

Pistache in Amsterdam. | japanesetrash.com

This event space is a mix of industrial and traditional with a black, white, and grey palette; it’s quite handsome. The charcoal colored pot with the impressive cactus is nice.

Stylish in Stockholm. | japanesetrash.com

Here’s that same palette again, but in a Stockholm apartment; this time the plants are potted in neutral-hued containers.

I like the deep green of the cactus here. | japanesetrash.com

The deep green of this cactus is delightful among the neutrals on this table photographed by Anders Schonnemann.

Concrete Containers

Round concrete pot by Roughfusion. | japanesetrash.com

Concrete planter by Roughfusion. | japanesetrash.com

Rough Fusion (or roughfusion? I’ve seen it both ways) would be where I would turn if I wanted containers for indoor plants. He made these two and has stores on Etsy and Scoutmob.

British Influence: Keep Calm and Carry On. | japanesetrash.com

Remember when this seemed to be in every interior that showed up online? That was back when Japanese Trash first began–I felt like I was seeing them everywhere. Who started the craze, and where did it go?

Houzz comes up with over 3,800 Keep Calm and Carry On home design photos, and the first one on the list (at least it is for me; who knows if the images show up in the same order for everyone) is from Victoria Smith’s blog, sfgirlbybay.com. When I saw that, I decided to take a look there and see if I could glean any history of the poster’s use in the kinds of interiors that were coming up on interior design blogs four years ago. And, guess what? Jackpot.

It turns out that Victoria herself seems to have (at least partially) built her empire on sales of her quality reproductions of the Keep Calm and Carry On artwork — note, I use the term “empire” as a pun here, just in case that wasn’t clear. The New York Times wrote about it a full year before Japanese Trash came online in its current form, and Victoria weighs in on the phenomenon in an interview on The Everygirl that was published in 2012. Well, good for you, Victoria!

Of course, as is the way with all popular culture it seems, it wasn’t long before backlash and parody began and now you don’t see the Keep Calm and Carry On posters around too much any more. But they will live forever on Houzz.

Here are a couple of classic examples, just in case you’re already feeling nostalgic:

Remember when this kitchen-and that poster-was everywhere? | japanesetrash.com

Just like the poster itself, there was a time when this kitchen seemed to be everywhere.

Another "Keep Calm" kitchen. | japanesetrash.com

And another Keep Calm kitchen; that thing must’ve really resonated with home cooks.

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