Currently viewing the tag: "art"

The black kitchen is a thing now, right? I mean, I’ve got a ton of kitchen pins and one of the things that stands out on that board is all the black kitchens. And why not, when going black in the kitchen can give you something like this:

Pretty GLAMasculine, right? These materials--and all that black--make for a remarkable glimpse of kitchen. | japanesetrash.com

Pretty remarkable, right? And that’s just the beginning of all the beautiful black kitchen goodness I have in store for you in this post.

Sticking with the glam factor for a moment, we have this contemporary Australian kitchen with a massive island that seems to be chiseled out of a solid block of black stone:

Is this island carved from a massive block of black stone? I know it's not but, dang that's impressive. | japanesetrash.com

There’s no doubt in my mind that all that black makes quite a statement–in these cases, that statement is: luxury. Here’s one more along those lines:

Such a statement of luxury here. I could easily get used to this. | japanesetrash.com

Black also looks great in the kitchen when played off of raw materials, like the brick wall in this one:

Terrific combination of rough brick and sleek finishes. Amazing lighting too. | japanesetrash.com

Or combined with other dramatic features like this marble and live-edge wood cooking/eating island:

Unf. This kitchen, with the marble and live-edge wood island and all that black, is so hot. | japanesetrash.com

What do you think? Is a black kitchen the thing for you too?

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When I found these images of this dramatic home designed by Michael Dawkins I knew I had to post them. These glimpses show a very refined and masculine dark space; let’s explore.

A wonderful gallery ledge along what appears to be the entry area. | japanesetrash.com

A wonderful gallery ledge along what appears to be the entry area.

Focus on a mysterious intersection. The dark floors are amazing. | japanesetrash.com

Focus on a mysterious intersection. The dark floors are amazing.

Nothing mysterious here, just more dark masculine glamour and a stunning view. | japanesetrash.com

Nothing mysterious here, just more dark masculine glamour and a stunning view.

This glimpse of bathroom makes me want to see so much more. | japanesetrash.com

This glimpse of bathroom makes me want to see so much more.

Ryann Ford is an interiors and architecture photographer who lives right here in Austin. Her work has graced the pages of The New York Times, Better Homes & Gardens, and Texas Monthly–just to name a few. She has a terrific eye and a wide-ranging portfolio. I’ve chosen just two of the projects she has worked on to show you, but there’s so much more to see at her website.

The first set of images come from a New York Times piece on a home designed and built by Austin architect, Burton Baldridge:

I'm digging the thin edge of the hot rolled steel counter against the rawness of the wood in that kitchen island. | japanesetrash.com

These are my favorite materials: concrete floors, steel and wood for the kitchen island, and plenty of glass.

This media loft is simple and just right. Loving all that light--plus the inset window that allows fresh air. | japanesetrash.com

The simplicity of this media loft really works for me. The flood of natural light is soooo nice, plus the added touch of an inset window to allow fresh air into the space.

This all works together so well--and is captured so beautifully by Ryann Ford's photography. | japanesetrash.com

More concrete, steel and wood–plus a nice fire, a bit of driftwood and a graphic print. Love this vibe.

The other project of Ryann Ford’s I’ve chosen are all photos of just one room in the home Roger + Chris used to own in Austin (you can see more of her shots of that house here):

The guest bedroom at Roger + Chris' former home in Austin, shot by Ryann Ford. | japanesetrash.com

Antlers, browns, textures, and a terrific paint job. | japanesetrash.com

Guest room detail-a cabinet of curiosities (with a Tivoli Model One thrown in). | japanesetrash.com

Everything about this room is remarkable–from the striking paint work to the use of textiles and accessories. And this space couldn’t be more different from the house at the start of this post, but both were captured masterfully by Ryann Ford.

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I’m that guy who can find inspiration for the home in just about anything, and today I’m looking at translating retail shelving solutions into home use. First off, these wood floating shelves caught my eye:

Wooden Floating Shelves | japanesetrash.com

I really like how they provide a clean, uninterrupted look. This image is so enticing, I began fantasizing about having a room-sized closet at home, just so I could create the same look. But a) I’m not that guy, and b) I don’t have the space, even if I were that guy! Since I think most of us would prefer a more practical use, I found a couple of examples to share. First, floating shelves in a living room–scaled appropriately for the space and very tastefully done:

A nice living room space with floating shelves flanking the doorway. | japanesetrash.com

The idea also looks great used in a contemporary kitchen:

Floating shelves in a contemporary kitchen. | japanesetrash.com

Next, my attention was grabbed by this shot of mixed shelving:

Mixed Shelving | japanesetrash.com

But really focused in on the Vipp shelf–those two metallic shelf sets bolted to the middle of the wall. Love the design, simplicity and versatility they show. Here’s a shot of a couple of them in a clean, contemporary bathroom:

Vipp shelf in a sleek, luxurious, and arty bathroom. | japanesetrash.com

And the Vipp shelf also works great in a kid’s room:

The Vipp shelf also works great in a kid's room. | japanesetrash.com

Finally, there’s the terrific look of industrial shelving made with pipe:

Industrial Shelving made with Pipe | japanesetrash.com

It’s a very popular look that has been translated into the home over and over in recent years:

An attractive and practical industrial pipe shelving unit. | japanesetrash.com

What are your thoughts on bringing retail shelving home? I’d love to find out how you’re already using it or how you plan to add it to your look.