Currently viewing the tag: "bedroom"

This is one of my favorite bedrooms on the planet. It’s a room that made me start thinking differently about contemporary interior design and one that has become so popular over the years that I think it’s now considered an icon of design. Today, I’m looking beyond the iconic bedroom and into the rest of the Francisco Costa home in NYC, courtesy of photography by Christopher Sturman.

This bedroom in the home of Francisco Costa has become iconic. | japanesetrash.com

But before we leave this room, let’s take a look at what makes it so appealing. The use of color and texture to create a soothing ambiance is spot on. The variety of size and type of art adds life. And the inclusion of a small table and a wall of shelving makes this space feel like a self-contained retreat:

The table and chairs plus the wall of shelving turn this bedroom into a retreat. | japanesetrash.com


The same types of elements carry over into the apartment’s study, where color, texture, art, and built in shelving–along with a refined but livable mix of furnishings–are to be found:

A refined but livable study. | japanesetrash.com

Here’s another shot of the study, along with the apartment’s owner, Francisco Costa. The mix of patterns here is interesting and brings a lot of visual interest to an otherwise serene space:

Terrific use of pattern in Francisco Costa's study. | japanesetrash.com


The clean lines and the herringbone pattern in the wood floor give this kitchen a Parisian feel:

The clean lines and the herringbone pattern in the wood floor give this kitchen a Parisian feel. | japanesetrash.com

Leather is one of those materials that I think works just about anywhere, any time; I have what you might call leather love and here are a few examples of some of my favorite uses of the material:

It was this image of this sofa that got me started on today’s leather binge:

Gerard Van Den Berg; Leather 'Ringo' Sofa for Montis, 1970s. | japanesetrash.com


But I have to admit, I have just as much regard for this leather sofa–love all the textures in this space as well:

Love this leather sofa & all the dark textures in the space. | japanesetrash.com


A leather dopp kit like this one is the kind that will last a lifetime:

Teranishi's leather dopp kit is a favorite. | japanesetrash.com


How about leather lampshades? As I mentioned, it’s the kind of material that can be used almost universally:

These leather lampshades from Anaesthetic are terrific. | japanesetrash.com


This headboard made from leather gym mats attached to the wall have been a long time favorite:

Leather gym mats as a headboard. Brilliant! | japanesetrash.com

Is it the weekend yet? Jeez what a week. Every time I wanted to go left, life seemed to go right. Oh, yeah, this is a post about Douglas Friedman, the super-hot interiors photographer. But more about him in a minute.

How was your week? If you’re amongst those who celebrate Labor Day, are you looking forward to a long holiday weekend? I sure as hell am. Is it a holiday weekend elsewhere on the planet? If you’re having a long weekend, no matter where you live, cheers to you!

Okay. Douglas Friedman. Oh, as I was saying, this week was super-crazy–mostly in a really good way: fun new work and potential new work (yay!), an amazing offer from a good friend that I’ll fill you in on in the weeks to come if it all comes about, a breakthrough on a tough project, and I’m running soooo behind on a couple of things I owe and must get out today before I close up shop. And when I’m having this kind of day at the end of this kind of week, there’s really nothing for it but to immerse myself in a soothing pool of interior design porn.

Enter: Douglas Friedman. AKA The Fascinator.

Douglas Friedman, AKA The Fascinator. I'm certainly fascinated, are you? | japanesetrash.com

Well, I’m certainly fascinated. Are you? This above image comes from the piece Refinery 29 did about the interiors of his own apartment, some of which are included below. All of the rest of the images come from Mr. Friedman himself.

Immerse yourself. Relax. Enjoy. And have a great weekend.

Wonderful materials, furnishings and textures. Photo: Douglas Friedman. | japanesetrash.com

Such a swank bedroom; love the architecture and all that glass. Photo: Douglas Friedman | japanesetrash.com

Douglas Friedman's living room; such a great mix of pieces. Photo: Douglas Friedman | japanesetrash.com

Douglas Friedman's hallway, with a glimpse of bathroom. Photo: Douglas Friedman | japanesetrash.com

Okay, so it’s not so much the penthouse that’s preposterous, but the photos of the Axel Vervoordt-designed penthouse at the Greenwich Hotel in NYC that are both gorgeous and a little–okay, in some cases, a lot–ridiculous.

First, the exterior of the building; really love this architecture. Plus, the image is exactly the kind of thing you’d expect to see if you’re told it’s an image of the building:

The very handsome Greenwich Hotel in NYC. | japanesetrash.com

The simple simple simple — but exquisite — main bedroom:

Absolutely exquisite main bedroom of the penthouse at Greenwich Hotel. | japanesetrash.com

Now the damn-near perfect, like I could move in there tomorrow, living room:

This living room at the Greenwich Hotel is perfect. | japanesetrash.com

The bathroom. Really?!? Does Vanity Fair think our sensitivities are too delicate to actually withstand being shown some fixtures? A shower or sink, perhaps? No, just this:

This is what the editors at Vanity Fair think works as a photo of a bathroom. Please. | japanesetrash.com

And here we have a shot of the corridor looking into a guest room. Got to admit, this design is stunning:

A very rich palette is shown in this corridor shot at the Greenwich Hotel's penthouse. | japanesetrash.com

If this kind of design is your thing, I’m with you; it’s visually stunning. But c’mon… the photo that is supposed to show the bathroom? What is that? And there are plenty more images, if you follow the links in this post to Vanity Fair, that seem cut from the same cloth as that of the bathroom–weird vignettes featuring dead looking flowers.

But, again, the design is terrific. And those photos that actually show the design instead of focusing on trying to create atmosphere–and, to my mind, there’s enough atmosphere right there in the design, thank you–are also a treasure.

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