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What’s more inclusive of nature than a cabin? Whether it’s a restored old family place or a brand new structure, a cabin sums up everything that living in nature is all about. Here are a few of my favorite cabins:

Hudson Woods

Contemporary Cabin: Hudson Woods | japanesetrash.com

Contemporary Cabin: Hudson Woods | japanesetrash.com

Contemporary Cabin: Hudson Woods | japanesetrash.com

Contemporary Cabin: Hudson Woods | japanesetrash.com

A contemporary cabin in the woods with all the modern conveniences, including a pool? Count me in. Hudson Woods by Lang Architecture is my kind of roughing it.

Alaskan Modernist

Alaskan Modernist Cabin | japanesetrash.com

Alaskan Modernist Cabin | japanesetrash.com

Alaskan Modernist Cabin | japanesetrash.com

Alaskan Modernist Cabin | japanesetrash.com

Alaskan Modernist Cabin | japanesetrash.com

Alaskan Modernist Cabin | japanesetrash.com

Alaskan Modernist Cabin | japanesetrash.com

The charred spruce exterior — using a Japanese technique called shou sugi ban — of this Alaskan Modernist cabin is nothing short of breathtaking-which completely suits the equally breathtaking natural surroundings.

Camp Indianola

Camp Indianola house tour on Japanese Trash. | japanesetrash.com

Camp Indianola house tour on Japanese Trash. | japanesetrash.com

Camp Indianola house tour on Japanese Trash. | japanesetrash.com

Camp Indianola house tour on Japanese Trash. | japanesetrash.com

Camp Indianola house tour on Japanese Trash. | japanesetrash.com

Camp Indianola house tour on Japanese Trash. | japanesetrash.com

Camp Indianola house tour on Japanese Trash. | japanesetrash.com

This Washington state retreat, which I’ve dubbed Camp Indianola, has all the right touches and a pared-back style that includes exposed log beams, integrated stone walls, and even an antler chandelier. Who needs more than that?

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As you think about incorporating nature into your interior design, be sure to consider using live-edge wood elements. Live-edge refers to the practice of showing the natural edge of the material, rather than an edge that has been cut or shaped by hand. Stone and wood both lend themselves to showing more natural texture and beauty through the live-edge treatment, and isn’t that what embracing natural elements in your rooms is all about?

Kitchen

Gorgeous live-edge wood kitchen island extension. | japanesetrash.com

The use of live-edge wood in interior design has been around since the first tree stump was used as a stool, but when Dwell founder Lara Hedberg Deam incorporated it into her kitchen, people took notice.

Bedroom

A live-edge wood headboard. | japanesetrash.com

This headboard is a terrific example of incorporating live-edge wood into a contemporary space.

Mudroom

Live-edge wood bench adds interest to this mudroom. | japanestrash.com

This live-edge wood bench is a smart and visually interesting addition to the mudroom/entry space.

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