Currently viewing the tag: "fireplace"

Have you ever been to New Orleans? It’s one of those cities I’ve visited on and off throughout my life, and if you’ve ever been there yourself you’ll agree it’s like no other place. I think the same can be said of New Orleans interior design–and certainly it’s true of the home I’m featuring today. There’s a feeling of being transported to another time and place in these spaces. I think it has to do with the colors and furnishings, but also there’s something about the way the rooms are scaled in older, deeply Southern houses that feels otherworldly. Let’s take a trip to New Orleans.

This living room displays all of the elements I was just mentioning, from the muted but rich tones to the pieces you want to touch and the intimate scale. Where but New Orleans would you have this particular quality of natural light?

I'm digging the feeling of this New Orleans interior design. | japanesetrash.com


The fireplace mantle is a makeshift coat rail in this bedroom. There are a number of fireplaces throughout this house–even in the kitchen.

The fireplace mantle makes for a makeshift coat rail in this New Orleans home. | japanesetrash.com


You can see the kitchen fireplace in this image of the dining area taken from the front room. Another feature of old Southern homes is the room known as the front room–different from a living room.

The dining space of the kitchen--with its fireplace--as seen from the front room. | japanesetrash.com


The home’s simple, contemporary, eat in kitchen. The bicycle is leaning against the fireplace.

A contemporary eat in kitchen in a New Orleans home full of character. | japanesetrash.com


The kitchen’s dining area has mirrored hanging barn-track doors at one end.

The kitchen's dining area has mirrored hanging barn-track doors at one end. | japanesetrash.com


A corner of the half-bathroom off of the kitchen holds a simple collection with plenty of visual texture.

A corner of the half-bathroom off of the kitchen holds a simple collection with plenty of visual texture. | japanesetrash.com

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This week’s leftovers include a very appealing outdoor lounge in Denmark:

A tranquil outdoor lounge in Denmark. | japanesetrash.com


A contemporary kitchen with a shock of color via a yellow range:

This contemporary kitchen comes alive thanks to the shock of color in that range. | japanesetrash.com


Another–very different style of–contemporary kitchen uses contrast and materials to create interest:

This contemporary kitchen uses contrast and materials to create interest. | japanesetrash.com


I’m a huge fan of cinder blocks, and this massive fireplace uses them to great effect:

This massive cinder block fireplace is just my style. | japanesetrash.com


Wrapping up with this elegant entry to one of Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi’s homes:

Such an elegant entry at the Trousdale home of Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi. | japanesetrash.com

 


p.s. Yes, it’s a holiday here and, yes, I’m taking the day off (I haven’t forgotten my mini-rant on Friday about needing a break) but I couldn’t have a Monday without Leftovers!

In praise of marble.

Ah, yes… the luxurious stone of interior design dreams, marble–which has always been a favorite of decorators–seems to have exploded onto just about every surface of the home in recent years. Let’s take a moment to look at a few examples from spaces all over the house:

This wood vanity with integrated marble sink and counter is so handsome. | japanesetrash.com

The design and tailoring–and, of course, the materials–of this wood vanity with integrated marble sink and counter make for a very sexy and timeless piece. I can imagine this in a modern apartment in Rome during the 1960s just as easily as in a contemporary home.


Exquisite black marble walls create a luxurious bathroom. | japanesetrash.com

Can you imagine having black marble walls in your bathroom? Along with the freestanding tub and teak slat flooring, this is the height of GLAMasculine. The wall sconce adds to the appeal of this look.


Marble surfboards - two of my favorite things together at last. | japanesetrash.com

Completely impractical for anything other than decorative effect, this pair of marble surfboards is pretty damn awesome. Now where would I put these…


Simple and modern marble counter, backsplash, and shelf. | japanesetrash.com

For a very unified look in the kitchen, this counter top, backsplash, and floating shelf is a simple and effective choice. I particularly like the integrated shelf.


Amazing fireplace statement look. I seriously want this. | japanesetrash.com

This fireplace has me weak in the knees. The simplicity of it, the bold and iconic design, and the choice of materials–marble included, naturally–make it a major statement piece. I seriously want to have this.

Okay, so it’s not so much the penthouse that’s preposterous, but the photos of the Axel Vervoordt-designed penthouse at the Greenwich Hotel in NYC that are both gorgeous and a little–okay, in some cases, a lot–ridiculous.

First, the exterior of the building; really love this architecture. Plus, the image is exactly the kind of thing you’d expect to see if you’re told it’s an image of the building:

The very handsome Greenwich Hotel in NYC. | japanesetrash.com

The simple simple simple — but exquisite — main bedroom:

Absolutely exquisite main bedroom of the penthouse at Greenwich Hotel. | japanesetrash.com

Now the damn-near perfect, like I could move in there tomorrow, living room:

This living room at the Greenwich Hotel is perfect. | japanesetrash.com

The bathroom. Really?!? Does Vanity Fair think our sensitivities are too delicate to actually withstand being shown some fixtures? A shower or sink, perhaps? No, just this:

This is what the editors at Vanity Fair think works as a photo of a bathroom. Please. | japanesetrash.com

And here we have a shot of the corridor looking into a guest room. Got to admit, this design is stunning:

A very rich palette is shown in this corridor shot at the Greenwich Hotel's penthouse. | japanesetrash.com

If this kind of design is your thing, I’m with you; it’s visually stunning. But c’mon… the photo that is supposed to show the bathroom? What is that? And there are plenty more images, if you follow the links in this post to Vanity Fair, that seem cut from the same cloth as that of the bathroom–weird vignettes featuring dead looking flowers.

But, again, the design is terrific. And those photos that actually show the design instead of focusing on trying to create atmosphere–and, to my mind, there’s enough atmosphere right there in the design, thank you–are also a treasure.

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