Currently viewing the tag: "house tour"

I don’t often focus on architecture (overtly) here, but seeing DOGBOX by Patch Work Architecture — a residence that has built by the architects in Whanganui, New Zealand — and loving the design and materials so much, I had to do a post that is nothing but this one structure. Both inside and out, the building uses space and materials to flow between intimate and expansive moments. There’s also a playfulness between what’s seen and what’s glimpsed and what’s only hinted at in silhouette that I find really appealing. I hope you like DOGBOX as much as I do.

A hero shot of the front elevation of DOGBOX by Patch Work Architecture. | japanesetrash.com

This terrific hero shot of the front elevation of the structure shows the elements and the interaction of outdoor/indoor so well.

Another nice view of the structure, aglow with interior light seen through translucent walls. | japanesetrash.com

Another nice view of the structure, aglow with interior light seen through translucent walls.

The open downstairs area, including functional niches that bring to mind Frank Lloyd Wright. | japanesetrash.com

The open downstairs area, including functional niches that bring to mind Frank Lloyd Wright. The entire back wall is poured concrete.

A playful silhouette shows through the twinwall polycarbonate panels that are used throughout. | japanesetrash.com

A playful silhouette shows through the twinwall polycarbonate panels that are used throughout the structure.

I've been a fan of the DOGBOX kitchen since the first time I saw it. | japanesetrash.com

I’ve been a fan of the DOGBOX kitchen since the first time I saw it. The simplicity and economy with which it’s fitted is very appealing.

A detail of the kitchen's main work counter. It's the simple, honest materials that appeal to me. | japanesetrash.com

A detail of the kitchen’s main work counter. Once again, it’s the simple, honest materials that appeal to me.

DOGBOX by Patch Work Architecture - work out space. | japanesetrash.com

I’m ready for a work out space like this.

A second-floor sleeping area. | japanesetrash.com

The open feeling extends to private spaces, like this second-floor sleeping area.

Even this simple wood storage cubby feels thoughtful. | japanesetrash.com

Even this simple wood storage cubby feels thoughtful.

m4s0n501

There’s something about Chris Nguyen, graphic artist, photographer, and interior designer from Houston–aka Analog|Dialog. For me, that something can be summed up in one image:

I've been on the edge of my seat for months, all because of this simple image. | japanesetrash.com

It may be the most compelling interior design image in the history of the Internet. No, I’m not exaggerating; this one simple photo has been out there in cyberspace (does anyone still call it that?) for months now on the Analog|Dialog site under the heading, “Stanford Preview” with the notation “coming soon”. And it’s had me on the edge of my seat because I reallyreallyreally want to see the rest of this space. Based on some of the other interior design work Chris Nguyen presents on his site, Stanford is going to be a knockout. Let’s take a look at some of those other projects:

Marshall Studio

This was the first of his projects I saw, when it was featured on Apartment Therapy’s Small Cool Home contest (it took the division win).

Chris Nguyen's studio space-a one-room wonder. | japanesetrash.com

There it is, the whole thing. A marvel of space planning, this one-room unit (there’s actually a small kitchen and dining area on the right of this image–that you can’t see) packs a lot of style into the space.

The workspace in the Marshall Studio. Designed by Chris Nguyen | japanesetrash.com

I’m particularly fond of this workspace and how he hung art in front of the windows. That desk has a roll-top closure that’s pretty dang sweet.

Houston House

Houston House is the second project of Chris’s that I remember seeing. It’s notable for using a strong masculine aesthetic in a model unit of an apartment development.

Terrific plumbing pipe bookshelf and desk in Chris Nguyen's Houston House design. | japanesetrash.com

You’ve probably all seen this terrific plumbing pipe bookcase and desk; it’s one of the best examples of this I’ve seen.

That sofa comes alive against the dark wall. Designed by Chris Nguyen | japanesetrash.com

The dark paint really makes that sofa come alive. It’s easy to see how Chris’s work as a graphic designer has influenced his interior design. I’m still not a fan of the gigantic task lamps as floor lamps, though.

There's strong graphic appeal to this open shelving display. Designed by Chris Nguyen | japanesetrash.com

The dark wall color and strong graphic nature of the interior design continues with these floating shelves in the kitchen.

Fannin

This project is where we can see Chris really hitting his stride–and it’s all the more reason to want to see what else he has in store for us with the Stanford design. There are so many great images for this space that I think I’ll just post them and let them do all the work:

Fannin: living and dining. Designed by Chris Nguyen | japanesetrash.com

Fannin: living room day bed. Designed by Chris Nguyen | japanesetrash.com

Fannin: living room chairs. Designed by Chris Nguyen | japanesetrash.com

Fannin: dining space. Designed by Chris Nguyen | japanesetrash.com

Fannin: bedroom detail. Designed by Chris Nguyen | japanesetrash.com

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