Currently viewing the tag: "industrial"

Awesome Keith Haring inspired graffiti art. | japanesetrash.com

Trends come and go; that’s why they’re called trends. Art is subjective—in the eye of the beholder, if you will—and that’s one of the great things about art: you’re either affected by something or you’re not. One person’s spray-painted abomination is another person’s perfect expression of self. So, when an artistic genre – like graffiti – becomes an interior design trend you can count on lines being drawn and people taking sides. – See more at: The Interior Collective

I hope everyone has started to relax into the weekend. I have, but I also have a new post from The Interior Collective to share with you. Enjoy!

Plumen decorative bulb in a vintage worklamp fixture. | japanesetrash.com

Now and then I’ll see a photo on some site or other that shows something interior design related that I think is so AWESOME and I CAN’T WAIT to try it myself. Recently I saw a terrific kitchen renovation online that had lighting consisting of simple sockets hanging from black cords; what made them AMAZING was the decorative bulbs used with the plain fixtures. Those bulbs made all the difference in the world and I COULDN’T WAIT to give that a whirl in my own home. (Okay, I’ll stop with the yelling; you just need to know how exited I get some times about this stuff.) Problem was, I didn’t have any fixtures that would lend themselves to the extra cool factor of using decorative bulbs. So, as usual, I decided I wanted to post about it so that all of you could benefit from my excitement, even if I can’t. – See more at: The Interior Collective

Okay, so it’s not so much the penthouse that’s preposterous, but the photos of the Axel Vervoordt-designed penthouse at the Greenwich Hotel in NYC that are both gorgeous and a little–okay, in some cases, a lot–ridiculous.

First, the exterior of the building; really love this architecture. Plus, the image is exactly the kind of thing you’d expect to see if you’re told it’s an image of the building:

The very handsome Greenwich Hotel in NYC. | japanesetrash.com

The simple simple simple — but exquisite — main bedroom:

Absolutely exquisite main bedroom of the penthouse at Greenwich Hotel. | japanesetrash.com

Now the damn-near perfect, like I could move in there tomorrow, living room:

This living room at the Greenwich Hotel is perfect. | japanesetrash.com

The bathroom. Really?!? Does Vanity Fair think our sensitivities are too delicate to actually withstand being shown some fixtures? A shower or sink, perhaps? No, just this:

This is what the editors at Vanity Fair think works as a photo of a bathroom. Please. | japanesetrash.com

And here we have a shot of the corridor looking into a guest room. Got to admit, this design is stunning:

A very rich palette is shown in this corridor shot at the Greenwich Hotel's penthouse. | japanesetrash.com

If this kind of design is your thing, I’m with you; it’s visually stunning. But c’mon… the photo that is supposed to show the bathroom? What is that? And there are plenty more images, if you follow the links in this post to Vanity Fair, that seem cut from the same cloth as that of the bathroom–weird vignettes featuring dead looking flowers.

But, again, the design is terrific. And those photos that actually show the design instead of focusing on trying to create atmosphere–and, to my mind, there’s enough atmosphere right there in the design, thank you–are also a treasure.

When it comes to kitchen trends, creating impact is always near the top of the list. Here’s a look at just a few kitchens impact that have come across my screen lately:

This kitchen has tremendous impact with its dramatic color scheme and metallic drawer fronts. | japanesetrash.com

Talk about impact. This kitchen has tremendous impact with its dramatic color scheme, wide plank flooring, focus wall with no upper cabinets, trio of hanging pendants and those amazing metallic drawer fronts.


A gorgeous sunken kitchen that makes a statement using all wooden finishes--including the ceiling. | japanesetrash.com

On the other end of the impact spectrum, we have this gorgeous sunken kitchen that makes a subtle–but clear–statement using all wooden finishes–including on the ceiling. One of my favorite touches here is the use of ottomans as low counter stools.


The framing of this kitchen feels like a stage opening, giving it a very theatrical effect. | japanesetrash.com

The way this black and white kitchen is set within a frame is very theatrical, giving the space a heightened and dramatic feeling. The high-gloss, GLAMasculine finishes add to that effect.


Minimal kitchen. With logs. Brilliant. | japanesetrash.com

Here the pendulum swings to the opposite side once again, with a starkly minimal kitchen where the impact and serene beauty comes from an under counter space filled with logs.


Impact in this kitchen is accomplished using layers. | japanesetrash.com

And here’s a kitchen that uses layering to create impact – layering of materials visually: wood/marble/cabinets/backsplash, and layering of color and texture. This kind of mixing makes magic when done as expertly as is shown here.

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