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Over the past four years, I’ve posted only a few images of the quintessential British furniture piece, the Chesterfield Sofa, but each one is worth revisiting because each one — and each interior style shown — is different in some way. And that sort of tells the tale of the Chesterfield in a nutshell: it’s the “goes anywhere” ubiquitous item. Let’s take a look:

Rustic Industrial

Leather Chesterfield in a rustic industrial setting. | japanesetrash.com

The  rough and smooth textures in this rustic industrial space, along with all the brown tones, combine to be the perfect setting for a Chesterfield. This one is skirted and has a tight tufted seat.

Contemporary

A fire and a Chesterfield; meant for each other. | japanesetrash.com

What’s cozier than a Chesterfield by the fire? This sofa, with exposed caster legs and three loose seat cushions, looks perfectly at home in this contemporary decor.

Brutalist

A red Chesterfield adds life to this awesome Brutalist interior. | japanesetrash.com

A terrific red Chesterfield looks right at home in this amazing Brazilian Brutalist space.

Ready to get your own Chesterfield sofa but not sure where to look? The only place I would turn to would be Roger+Chris; their Higgins Chesterfield can be ordered in literally hundreds of configurations. Here are a few of my favorites:

Higgins Chesterfield from Roger+Chris in traditional brown leather. | japanesetrash.com

Higgins Chesterfield from Roger+Chris in camo. | japanesetrash.com

Red leather sectional Higgins Chesterfield from Roger+Chris. | japanesetrash

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I often find interior design inspiration in films, and this adaptation of the comic book “Kingsman: The Secret Service” looks to be full of great sets that can spark all kinds of ideas for your space. Let’s take a look at a few of them:

The Tailor Shop

Interior inspiration from the upcoming film, Kingsman: The Secret Service. | japanesetrash.com

To my American eyes, this could not be more clearly traditional British interior design–lots of wood, a leather easy chair, framed photos, and brass accents. Some rooms that use the same elements to great effect include these:

The Sydney home of Leah Fraser & David Shrimpton. | japanesetrash.com

The Sydney home of Leah Fraser and David Shrimpton.

A terrific update of the wood, leather, and brass look. | japanesetrash.com

This terrific update of the wood, leather, and brass look happens to be in a Swedish hotel.

Designers Roman and Williams know how to modernize traditional looks. | japanesetrash.com

Designers Roman and Williams know how to modernize traditional looks for today’s lifestyle.

Secret Entrance

Every spy movie needs a secret entrance. | japanesetrash.com

What’s a spy movie–especially a funny one–without a secret entrance? I especially like the brick and tile work and have rounded up a few examples of how that translates into interiors:

Brick floor & subway tiled walls; terrific! | japanesetrash.com

Loving the look of this kitchen with brick floors and full walls of subway tile.

Green subway tile always makes for a great look. | japanesetrash.com

The green subway tile here looks great with wood and stainless steel–as good as it does with brick.

Gorgeous green subway tile used in this Barcelona hotel. | japanesetrash.com

More gorgeous green subway tile used throughout the bathrooms of the Hotel Praktik Rambla in Barcelona.

I hope these examples have given you some ideas for how films can inspire your home decorating projects. Have a look at the trailer for Kingsman: The Secret Service — it looks good, don’t you think?

p.s. A couple of the pieces in these images are available on the Japanese Trash Shop; here they are for your convenience:

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