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British Influence: Keep Calm and Carry On. | japanesetrash.com

Remember when this seemed to be in every interior that showed up online? That was back when Japanese Trash first began–I felt like I was seeing them everywhere. Who started the craze, and where did it go?

Houzz comes up with over 3,800 Keep Calm and Carry On home design photos, and the first one on the list (at least it is for me; who knows if the images show up in the same order for everyone) is from Victoria Smith’s blog, sfgirlbybay.com. When I saw that, I decided to take a look there and see if I could glean any history of the poster’s use in the kinds of interiors that were coming up on interior design blogs four years ago. And, guess what? Jackpot.

It turns out that Victoria herself seems to have (at least partially) built her empire on sales of her quality reproductions of the Keep Calm and Carry On artwork — note, I use the term “empire” as a pun here, just in case that wasn’t clear. The New York Times wrote about it a full year before Japanese Trash came online in its current form, and Victoria weighs in on the phenomenon in an interview on The Everygirl that was published in 2012. Well, good for you, Victoria!

Of course, as is the way with all popular culture it seems, it wasn’t long before backlash and parody began and now you don’t see the Keep Calm and Carry On posters around too much any more. But they will live forever on Houzz.

Here are a couple of classic examples, just in case you’re already feeling nostalgic:

Remember when this kitchen-and that poster-was everywhere? | japanesetrash.com

Just like the poster itself, there was a time when this kitchen seemed to be everywhere.

Another "Keep Calm" kitchen. | japanesetrash.com

And another Keep Calm kitchen; that thing must’ve really resonated with home cooks.

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I often find interior design inspiration in films, and this adaptation of the comic book “Kingsman: The Secret Service” looks to be full of great sets that can spark all kinds of ideas for your space. Let’s take a look at a few of them:

The Tailor Shop

Interior inspiration from the upcoming film, Kingsman: The Secret Service. | japanesetrash.com

To my American eyes, this could not be more clearly traditional British interior design–lots of wood, a leather easy chair, framed photos, and brass accents. Some rooms that use the same elements to great effect include these:

The Sydney home of Leah Fraser & David Shrimpton. | japanesetrash.com

The Sydney home of Leah Fraser and David Shrimpton.

A terrific update of the wood, leather, and brass look. | japanesetrash.com

This terrific update of the wood, leather, and brass look happens to be in a Swedish hotel.

Designers Roman and Williams know how to modernize traditional looks. | japanesetrash.com

Designers Roman and Williams know how to modernize traditional looks for today’s lifestyle.

Secret Entrance

Every spy movie needs a secret entrance. | japanesetrash.com

What’s a spy movie–especially a funny one–without a secret entrance? I especially like the brick and tile work and have rounded up a few examples of how that translates into interiors:

Brick floor & subway tiled walls; terrific! | japanesetrash.com

Loving the look of this kitchen with brick floors and full walls of subway tile.

Green subway tile always makes for a great look. | japanesetrash.com

The green subway tile here looks great with wood and stainless steel–as good as it does with brick.

Gorgeous green subway tile used in this Barcelona hotel. | japanesetrash.com

More gorgeous green subway tile used throughout the bathrooms of the Hotel Praktik Rambla in Barcelona.

I hope these examples have given you some ideas for how films can inspire your home decorating projects. Have a look at the trailer for Kingsman: The Secret Service — it looks good, don’t you think?

p.s. A couple of the pieces in these images are available on the Japanese Trash Shop; here they are for your convenience:

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