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I’m heading out today to drive a few hours for a new client meeting near Houston, and while I’m away I’m leaving you with something a bit different: water. More specifically, water incorporated into outdoor / landscape design. This first image is the one that got me interested in seeing what I might be able to find in this area of design that would grab my interest–because this one certainly did:

These shapes and materials really grabbed my interest and got me focused on outdoor water features. | japanesetrash.com


Next, I found this example–showing me that just about any interior style might be interpreted outdoors:

I like the way this feels similar to a modern take on rustic that you might find indoors. | japanesetrash.com


Which made me want to start looking to see what other kinds of my favorite styles might be found outdoors. This is so GLAMasculine:

GLAMasculine stone and steel water feature. | japanesetrash.com


And this has a terrific modernist look:

A water wall with a terrific modernist look. | japanesetrash.com


Concrete, stone, and stainless steel. Some of my very favorite materials interpreted so handsomely in this outdoor water element:

Concrete, stone, and stainless steel: I'm in lust. | japanesetrash.com

This week’s leftovers include some rustic love in the form of wonderful woods, a random antler, and terrific Filson gear:

Amazing textures in this rustic space. | japanesetrash.com


The subway tile and hints of MCM lines in the cabinetry make this kitchen special:

Definite MCM feel in this cabinetry, and I'm always a fan of subway tile. | japanesetrash.com


More great tile work in this shower from an urban cabin in Los Angeles:

The tile work here is just about perfect, as is the transition to wooden flooring. | japanesetrash.com


I cannot resist the Artichoke Lamp; it’s one of my all time favorite pieces:

I've always had a special place in my heart for the Artichoke Lamp. | japanesetrash.com


And this simple sink from a 196 square foot home that got a lot of attention online last week:

This simple sink is sheer perfection as part of a 196 square foot home. | japanesetrash.com

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When it comes to kitchen trends, creating impact is always near the top of the list. Here’s a look at just a few kitchens impact that have come across my screen lately:

This kitchen has tremendous impact with its dramatic color scheme and metallic drawer fronts. | japanesetrash.com

Talk about impact. This kitchen has tremendous impact with its dramatic color scheme, wide plank flooring, focus wall with no upper cabinets, trio of hanging pendants and those amazing metallic drawer fronts.


A gorgeous sunken kitchen that makes a statement using all wooden finishes--including the ceiling. | japanesetrash.com

On the other end of the impact spectrum, we have this gorgeous sunken kitchen that makes a subtle–but clear–statement using all wooden finishes–including on the ceiling. One of my favorite touches here is the use of ottomans as low counter stools.


The framing of this kitchen feels like a stage opening, giving it a very theatrical effect. | japanesetrash.com

The way this black and white kitchen is set within a frame is very theatrical, giving the space a heightened and dramatic feeling. The high-gloss, GLAMasculine finishes add to that effect.


Minimal kitchen. With logs. Brilliant. | japanesetrash.com

Here the pendulum swings to the opposite side once again, with a starkly minimal kitchen where the impact and serene beauty comes from an under counter space filled with logs.


Impact in this kitchen is accomplished using layers. | japanesetrash.com

And here’s a kitchen that uses layering to create impact – layering of materials visually: wood/marble/cabinets/backsplash, and layering of color and texture. This kind of mixing makes magic when done as expertly as is shown here.

Ryann Ford is an interiors and architecture photographer who lives right here in Austin. Her work has graced the pages of The New York Times, Better Homes & Gardens, and Texas Monthly–just to name a few. She has a terrific eye and a wide-ranging portfolio. I’ve chosen just two of the projects she has worked on to show you, but there’s so much more to see at her website.

The first set of images come from a New York Times piece on a home designed and built by Austin architect, Burton Baldridge:

I'm digging the thin edge of the hot rolled steel counter against the rawness of the wood in that kitchen island. | japanesetrash.com

These are my favorite materials: concrete floors, steel and wood for the kitchen island, and plenty of glass.

This media loft is simple and just right. Loving all that light--plus the inset window that allows fresh air. | japanesetrash.com

The simplicity of this media loft really works for me. The flood of natural light is soooo nice, plus the added touch of an inset window to allow fresh air into the space.

This all works together so well--and is captured so beautifully by Ryann Ford's photography. | japanesetrash.com

More concrete, steel and wood–plus a nice fire, a bit of driftwood and a graphic print. Love this vibe.

The other project of Ryann Ford’s I’ve chosen are all photos of just one room in the home Roger + Chris used to own in Austin (you can see more of her shots of that house here):

The guest bedroom at Roger + Chris' former home in Austin, shot by Ryann Ford. | japanesetrash.com

Antlers, browns, textures, and a terrific paint job. | japanesetrash.com

Guest room detail-a cabinet of curiosities (with a Tivoli Model One thrown in). | japanesetrash.com

Everything about this room is remarkable–from the striking paint work to the use of textiles and accessories. And this space couldn’t be more different from the house at the start of this post, but both were captured masterfully by Ryann Ford.

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