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There's more to floating shelves than you might think. | japanesetrash.com

Some things are simply self-evident. The sky is blue, fire is hot, and shelves store stuff. Or shelves display stuff. Or shelves help organize stuff. My point is that—at least on the surface of the subject—there’s really nothing new to discover about shelves. Or is there? I started taking a look at shelves – floating shelves, specifically – and found that there’s actually more than meets the eye when it comes to the kinds of things you can do with floating shelves. Here’s what I discovered: – See more at: The Interior Collective.

Exposed rafters in this Jeffrey Alan Marks design. | japanesetrash.com

I know what you’re thinking. You’re wondering if they put the wrong name on the author line of this post, aren’t you? How that little image of the person who wrote this could possibly be Dave Hime when the first room being shown is so… traditional. I understand your confusion—that’s not the kind of interior design I’m typically drawn to, but this first room is a great example of the kind of thing most people picture in their minds when they read the phrase “exposed rafters.” – See more at: The Interior Collective.

Have you ever been to New Orleans? It’s one of those cities I’ve visited on and off throughout my life, and if you’ve ever been there yourself you’ll agree it’s like no other place. I think the same can be said of New Orleans interior design–and certainly it’s true of the home I’m featuring today. There’s a feeling of being transported to another time and place in these spaces. I think it has to do with the colors and furnishings, but also there’s something about the way the rooms are scaled in older, deeply Southern houses that feels otherworldly. Let’s take a trip to New Orleans.

This living room displays all of the elements I was just mentioning, from the muted but rich tones to the pieces you want to touch and the intimate scale. Where but New Orleans would you have this particular quality of natural light?

I'm digging the feeling of this New Orleans interior design. | japanesetrash.com


The fireplace mantle is a makeshift coat rail in this bedroom. There are a number of fireplaces throughout this house–even in the kitchen.

The fireplace mantle makes for a makeshift coat rail in this New Orleans home. | japanesetrash.com


You can see the kitchen fireplace in this image of the dining area taken from the front room. Another feature of old Southern homes is the room known as the front room–different from a living room.

The dining space of the kitchen--with its fireplace--as seen from the front room. | japanesetrash.com


The home’s simple, contemporary, eat in kitchen. The bicycle is leaning against the fireplace.

A contemporary eat in kitchen in a New Orleans home full of character. | japanesetrash.com


The kitchen’s dining area has mirrored hanging barn-track doors at one end.

The kitchen's dining area has mirrored hanging barn-track doors at one end. | japanesetrash.com


A corner of the half-bathroom off of the kitchen holds a simple collection with plenty of visual texture.

A corner of the half-bathroom off of the kitchen holds a simple collection with plenty of visual texture. | japanesetrash.com

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I was in the midst of putting together a different post — one on modernist homes in the desert, something I’ll run soon, I’m sure — when I saw this image and it distracted me:

Entry area with terrific pieces and one of my favorite palettes. | japanesetrash.com

First off, this is one of my favorite palettes–the grey, white, and ambers-running-to-deep-orange hues. Secondly, as I learned when I explored more about this apartment, this is a retiree’s unit in an assisted living facility, which I find to be both amazing and very good news for all our futures.


Since it’s impossible for me not to take a further look around the space after seeing the first image, here is the dining area:

A simple dining space in a retiree's assisted living unit. | japanesetrash.com


And, to wrap up the brief tour, the bedroom:

Bedroom by RDK Design for Donald D. Powell. | japanesetrash.com

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